DUARTE:  EVERETT & FRANCES

EVERETT DUARTE

Everett Paul Duarte is a contemporary South African artist who’s paintings celebrate colour, life and spirit in an organic way.                                                      

Bursting, flowing, decomposing and re-emerging the forms appear in a constant state of transition.

 

The visual language he creates on the canvas is both powerful and engaging, with each piece he intertwines a story about the natural course of existence.

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FRANCES DUARTE

Frances Schandera-Duarte includes a large palette of eclectic art materials in her paintings. These are fashioned in a way that merge and blend all elements into a unified and compelling whole. She layers oil paint with ink, incorporates glued surgical gauze, mineral sands and various papers to create these meditative paintings. White provides her with an imaginary space, specific visual elements layered into the whiteness appear to ‘glow’ from within the surface.     

Frances Schandera-Duarte includes a large palette of eclectic art materials in her paintings. These are fashioned in a way that merge and blend all elements into a unified and compelling whole. She layers oil paint with ink, incorporates glued surgical gauze, mineral sands and various papers to create these meditative paintings. White provides her with an imaginary space, specific visual elements layered into the whiteness appear to ‘glow’ from within the surface.     

MPENJAs

Frances & Everett Collaboration

Everett and Frances Duarte are indeed an intriguing double act.

Mpenja is a coming together of two minds and two continents. Everett, a self confessed African rock lizard (he turns peculiar without the sun) meets in an almost sacred artistic space with Frances – a cooler blooded European - born and bred in Mittweida, Germany.

Fascinatingly, they work together to create a kind of visual dialogue in every piece. Both mix colours, both paint layer upon layer, both wrestle and grapple until both finally agree that the piece is finished. Frances tells me that the work is often done in silence – it’s both heart felt and cerebral.